County Locations

Rising Waters Bring New Toxics Threat to Hunters Point

S.F.’s Hunters Point is already toxic for residents and the Bay. Sea level and groundwater rise, along with bigger storms, threaten to make the problem worse.

All Stories

Canal Residents Wade into Citizen Science

Canal Residents Wade into Citizen Science

Organizers of the bilingual King Tide Day/Día de las Mareas Reales along the San Rafael Canal on February 10 hoped witnessing the highest tides of the year could help make the area’s vulnerability to sea level rise more real to residents.

A Landscape Made to Flood in Sonoma

A Landscape Made to Flood in Sonoma

Tall oaks with submerged trunks are sure signs that the land is “flooded.” While for some areas that might be a negative, for Laguna de Santa Rosa it’s not only positive but protective.

Wheat Fields or Walkable City for Solano Open Space?

Wheat Fields or Walkable City for Solano Open Space?

A proposal for a 17,500-acre new sustainable city in Solano County’s rolling hills has locals worrying and dreaming. County voters will likely embrace or reject the resulting “East Solano Homes, Jobs, and Clean Energy Initiative” in November 2024.

Beach Loss Looms for the California Coast

Beach Loss Looms for the California Coast

Even though Dan Hoover’s been surveying the same stretch of San Francisco’s Pacific coast for 15 years on his ATV, it never looks the same. In summer it’s wider and in winter narrower. With El Niño the beach will erode more than ever.

Fighting Chance for Marin’s Forests?

Fighting Chance for Marin’s Forests?

With climate change, forests across California seem doomed to retreat, but maybe not everywhere. In at least one coastal county, there’s hope of keeping valued woodlands healthy, provided past mistakes can be corrected, fast.

Who’s on First at the SF Seawall?

Who’s on First at the SF Seawall?

Ten months after the Port of San Francisco lowered 288 experimental tiles into the water, these bio-friendly seawall surfaces are already crawling with crabs and covered in kelp. This August, researchers are finally getting a good look at all the tile types in their experiment, which range from large to small, and from bumpy to smooth, and which were hung from the waterfront at three different locations and tidal elevations in October 2022.

Wildlife Roll With Wildfire

Wildlife Roll With Wildfire

Imagine a Mad Max-style wasteland, ravaged by wildfire, but populated by frolicking woodland fauna. That’s what Kendall Calhoun was surprised to see just months after one of California’s biggest megafires.

Crunching the Adaptation Numbers – Not Peanuts

Crunching the Adaptation Numbers – Not Peanuts

Regional agencies made splashy headlines when they released a joint study on the likely cost of protecting Bay Area shores from rising seas: $110 billion. But the top-line number didn’t offer much insight into the complexities. A new inventory and map from the same agencies is much more revealing.

Riding the Bus As Climate Bliss?

Riding the Bus As Climate Bliss?

You’re on the bus. It’s your evening commute. The bus is almost full. Soft waves of chatter wash over you as you watch the blurred lights of storefronts pass by.

Being Human in Big Weather

Being Human in Big Weather

When it rained this May, it felt unexpected. Based on over 150 years of climate data for San Francisco, May typically gets several days with a light rain. But context is key, and we are coming out of three years of drought—a fact which will generally color memories in a drier hue. “If I’ve learned anything it is that people’s perceptions are usually wrong,” says Jan Null….

New Flood Protection Standard for the Peninsula

New Flood Protection Standard for the Peninsula

In San Mateo County, new planning guidance may help cities account for rising seas when approving new developments. OneShoreline’s proposals are stricter than current requirements from federal, state, and local agencies, but those are also evolving. “The intent is to go where we already see regulators are going,” says Makena Wong, a project manager.

Shores that Can Shapeshift AND Stay Put?

Shores that Can Shapeshift AND Stay Put?

The region is obsessing over beach-building. Whether it’s a degraded salt marsh in downtown San Rafael or a sliver of wetlands near the old San Francisco shipyards, local practitioners are adding beaches as nature-based buffers against waves and rising seas to adaptation projects around the Bay.

Humanity on the Fence

Humanity on the Fence

A new public art installation, called Fencelines, redefines the only barrier separating Richmond’s residential neighborhoods from the Chevron oil refinery: a wire fence.

Growing a Rainbow in the Urban Dirt

Growing a Rainbow in the Urban Dirt

Debbie Harris directs Urban Adamah, a Jewish urban farm in Northwest Berkeley. She is a farmer by trade but her role at Urban Adamah requires her to be “a horticulturalist, a plumber, a therapist, a teacher, an organizer.”

Food Forests Green Solano

Food Forests Green Solano

This spring, Sustainable Solano hosted open gardens that they helped plan and plant, offering visitors a chance to discover these food forests: a garden layered like a natural forest that includes fruit-bearing trees and edible plants.

Picturing Winter on Coyote Creek

Picturing Winter on Coyote Creek

In this photo essay, Megan King captures the Coyote Creek watershed swollen with water after winter storms. Last year, she explored something completely different: drought.

Five Threats in Five Places

Five Threats in Five Places

Coastal erosion in Pacifica, drought in Brentwood, fires in the North Bay, flooding in Union City, and urban heat in San Jose. Anissa Foster takes us on a revealing virtual tour.