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Solar Ceilings for Farmland, Coal Mines, Desert

Author Alastair Bland By Alastair Bland
Almost 3,000 acres of Mojave Desert will soon be permanently shaded by solar panels. Federal officials have indicated they’re ready to approve a third plant in the same area. Better...

Ordering the Path to Wildlife Resilience

Author Jacoba Charles By Jacoba Charles
Wildlife need wild pathways — corridors of trees, streams, meadows, or other habitat that allows them to move through a landscape increasingly fragmented by human alteration. And as climate change...

Power Down, Safety Up for Christmas Hill

"We’re still in the process of analyzing our other fire-prone areas of town, but based on what we already know about Christmas Tree Hill’s vulnerabilities to fire and its limited...

The Farm That Could

In 2019, Governor Newsom signed AB 1486 into law which connects developers interested in building more affordable homes with surplus public land suitable for housing. In the Bay Area, the...

In-Depth

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Less is More In Second Growth Forests

Author Lilah Burke By Lilah Burke
The towering old-growth forests of California’s Redwood National and State Parks attract thousands of visitors per year. But the once-logged and reseeded adjacent forests aren't so healthy, prompting a restoration...

Suisin City Is No Island

Author Aleta George By Aleta George
Suisun City has always had the waterfront and nearby wetlands at its heart but it won’t be long before the entire area is vulnerable to flooding from sea level rise.

Art Carries Water To Our Horizon

Author Lujain Al-Saleh By Lujain Al-Saleh
The idea of On the Horizon first blossomed in 2017 when Fernández attended an Art + Environment Conference at the Nevada Museum of Art. Over the next two years, Fernández...

Yell Fire on a Community Network

Author Daniel McGlynn By Daniel McGlynn
When Sonoma County residents smell smoke, they usually hop on social media or check some alert services like Nixle or PulsePoint to find out what’s going on. But social media...

Quick Reads

Ordering the Path to Wildlife Resilience

Wildlife need wild pathways — corridors of trees, streams, meadows, or other habitat that allows them to move through a landscape increasingly fragmented by human alteration. And as climate change upends formerly stable patterns, wildlife’s need for corridors must also shift, often in complex ways, in order for each species and ecosystem to remain resilient.

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Power Down, Safety Up for Christmas Hill

“We’re still in the process of analyzing our other fire-prone areas of town, but based on what we already know about Christmas Tree Hill’s vulnerabilities to fire and its limited access routes, we felt it was prudent to initiate this project right away,” says Ron Suokko, Corte Madera’s director of public works.

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The Farm That Could

In 2019, Governor Newsom signed AB 1486 into law which connects developers interested in building more affordable homes with surplus public land suitable for housing. In the Bay Area, the housing crisis is nothing new. Using public land to create affordable housing is a step towards solving the crisis. However, taking Happy Lot Farm and Gardens land to service one need would also be squandering another need, in this case, urban farming in food deserts.

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In-Depth

Less is More In Second Growth Forests

The towering old-growth forests of California’s Redwood National and State Parks attract thousands of visitors per year. But the once-logged and reseeded adjacent forests aren’t so healthy, prompting a restoration initiative.

Read More

Suisin City Is No Island

Suisun City has always had the waterfront and nearby wetlands at its heart but it won’t be long before the entire area is vulnerable to flooding from sea level rise.

Read More

Art Carries Water To Our Horizon

The idea of On the Horizon first blossomed in 2017 when Fernández attended an Art + Environment Conference at the Nevada Museum of Art. Over the next two years, Fernández was driven to figure out a way to suspend six feet of water and visualize the magnitude of the sea level rise.

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Yell Fire on a Community Network

When Sonoma County residents smell smoke, they usually hop on social media or check some alert services like Nixle or PulsePoint to find out what’s going on. But social media isn’t really designed for quickly and accurately sharing disaster alerts.

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CHATTER

The "#KingTides also remind us how complex of an issue a few extra inches of seawater really is... It all has to be considered together to prepare the region for more sea-level rise." https://www.kneedeeptimes.org/royally-flooded-dispatches-from-the-highest-tides/ @KneeDeepTimes @SierraGInTheSea @CA_king_tides

What do watching king tides, second growth redwood forests, and Suisin City's climate plans have in common? They're all in our first stories of 2022, which are live today!

Read and share our in-depth coverage on #climate resilience in the #BayArea at https://www.kneedeeptimes.org.

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U.S. dietary guidelines recommend eating more meat than other nations do. Watch "Red Meat Has Big Hoofprints," an explainer from our next-gen inspiration team contributor Hoi Shan Cheung, to learn how this impacts Americans' greenhouse gas emissions.

https://www.kneedeeptimes.org/red-meat-has-big-hoofprints

Through a 12-week program called the Environmental Justice Parent Academy, @NuestraCasa1 is leading in-depth discussions to give local context to climate change and sea-level rise, disaster preparedness, and — perhaps most importantly — civic engagement.

🎨 by Vrinda Manglik

Several of our latest quick reads deal with the nitty-gritty of #climate adaptation. How does it work on a local planning level? Are we adapting globally? How do #LandBack efforts play into adaptation? (1/3)

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Picture of the Month

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January 2022 For the last seven years, the Rogers family has driven from Pacifica to Tahoe, shoveled their car full of snow, and returned to Pacifica to spread holiday cheer in the shape of large-as-life snowmen along the pier. This year the snowmen migrated away from the water’s edge to escape king-sized waves and tides. Photo: Sierra Garcia

January 2022

For the last seven years, the Rogers family has driven from Pacifica to Tahoe, shoveled their car full of snow, and returned to Pacifica to spread holiday cheer in the shape of large-as-life snowmen along the pier. This year the snowmen migrated away from the water’s edge to escape king-sized waves and tides. Photo: Sierra Garcia