Category: Sea Level Rise

New Jersey Shells Out for Retreat

New Jersey’s Blue Acres program buys homes in flood-prone areas and converts them to open space. This not only moves frontline residents out of danger, but also protects neighbors.

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Coast Leaders Talk Graceful Withdrawal

In two brief audio interviews, KneeDeep Times asks the Coastal Conservancy’s Amy Hutzel and the Coastal Commission’s Mary Matella for their perspective on planned withdrawal from sea level rise and the crumbling coast.

New Jersey Shells Out for Retreat

New Jersey’s Blue Acres program buys homes in flood-prone areas and converts them to open space. This not only moves frontline residents out of danger, but also protects neighbors.

Retreat By Any Other Name

“Retreat can conjure failure, and nobody wants to be managed,” explained the study’s lead author Amanda Stolz at the California Social Coast Forum this March. Part of the problem is the term itself. One Pacifica resident quoted in the study commented, “Managed retreat’ is a code word for give up — on our homes and the town itself.”

A Day On The Bayview’s Shifting Shore

I set out for Heron’s Head Park on an early March morning. To my surprise, I had never heard of, nor visited, this site on the southeastern bayshore in my 20-plus years growing up and living as a visual artist in San Francisco.

Realmente Inundado: Observaciones de Las Mareas Más Altas

Los automóviles que ingresaban a la rampa de la autopista en Mill Valley zumbaban a través de cientos de metros de agua salada hasta los tobillos. Junto a la pista del Aeropuerto Internacional de San Francisco, el agua de la bahía brotaba hasta la carretera desde un desagüe pluvial.

Suisun City Is No Island

Suisun City has always had the waterfront and nearby wetlands at its heart but it won’t be long before the entire area is vulnerable to flooding from sea level rise.

Art Carries Water To Our Horizon

The idea of On the Horizon first blossomed in 2017 when Fernández attended an Art + Environment Conference at the Nevada Museum of Art. Over the next two years, Fernández was driven to figure out a way to suspend six feet of water and visualize the magnitude of the sea level rise.

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