Category: Science

Chasing the Fireline

In California, climate change has has left a collection of wildfire hazard zone maps, published 15 years ago, out of date.

Betting on Biochar

Rather than entering the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, the carbon in biochar remains as a solid, sequestered and lined up for a host of further uses.

Loading

All Stories

Seeding Citizen Scientists

Billy Krimmel decided to sow tens of thousands of native seeds around Davis and do everything wrong. Everything wrong, at least, by the standards of the professional landscapers.

Chasing the Fireline

In California, climate change has has left a collection of wildfire hazard zone maps, published 15 years ago, out of date.

Betting on Biochar

Rather than entering the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, the carbon in biochar remains as a solid, sequestered and lined up for a host of further uses.

Burns for the Birds

Scientists examined islands of near-total deforestation after fires and found new landscapes born from the scorched earth. They also found birds hunting for seeds and insects in these new open areas…

Dryer Vents Blow Hot Air & Microplastics

New research confirms that air vents on tumble dryers – rather than washing machines – may be a leading source of microplastic fibers from clothing in the environment. The insidious little particles are being found, among other places, in ocean-caught fish, beer, and even fecal samples of newborn babies.  

Coastal Mapping Tool Updated to Include Groundwater

In the past decade sea level rise models have popped up faster than fungi after a storm: today it seems like every agency has one. However in August USGS geologist Patrick Barnard and colleagues at Point Blue Conservation Science unveiled a new feature of their Our Coast, Our Future (OCOF) tool that none of the others have: a projection of how sea level rise will impact local groundwater along the California coast.

Butterflies in Residence Hedge Against Climate Change?

While monarch butterfly numbers at traditional winter roosts on the California coast hit an all-time low of about 2000 last winter, citizen-science observers have noticed that some remain in the San Francisco Bay Area year-round. Biologists Elizabeth Crone (Tufts University) and Cheryl Schulz (Washington State University) estimate a resident population of 12,000 in northern and central California, extrapolating from a Berkeley survey.

Three Ways to Feed the Marsh

Seal Beach is drowning. As a result of sea-level rise, subsidence, and limited sediment supply, much of the 920-acre National Wildlife Refuge in Orange County can no longer keep its head above water. Pacific cordgrass, normally exposed at low tides, is being completely inundated. Rare nesting habitat for the endangered light-footed clapper rail is disappearing at high tides.

Loading