Category: Hearts & Minds

Climate Adaptation: The Basics

Resilient sweet potatoes and stilts on houses remind us how adaptable human beings can be. This graphic guide samples our earliest and most recent history of adaptation.

Art Carries Water To Our Horizon

The idea of On the Horizon first blossomed in 2017 when Fernández attended an Art + Environment Conference at the Nevada Museum of Art. Over the next two years, Fernández was driven to figure out a way to suspend six feet of water and visualize the magnitude of the sea level rise.

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Climate Adaptation: The Basics

Resilient sweet potatoes and stilts on houses remind us how adaptable human beings can be. This graphic guide samples our earliest and most recent history of adaptation.

Art Carries Water To Our Horizon

The idea of On the Horizon first blossomed in 2017 when Fernández attended an Art + Environment Conference at the Nevada Museum of Art. Over the next two years, Fernández was driven to figure out a way to suspend six feet of water and visualize the magnitude of the sea level rise.

East Palo Alto Shows Up to Speak Up

East Palo Alto faces escalating housing prices and declining affordability, gentrification, and a rising bay. Nuestra Casa is leading discussions about these issues with local parents, and paying them for their time.

Petaluma Starts Climate Conversations

Petaluma made international news earlier this year for enacting the nation’s first ban on new gas stations. The city of 60,000 in southern Sonoma County also moved this year to prohibit natural gas in nearly all new construction, and hasn’t allowed new drive-thrus since 2008. It aims to be carbon neutral by 2030.

North Bay Towns Embrace Drought Gardens

The conundrums of whether or not to spend water on gardening during a drought are many. Growing backyard food is not just enjoyable, it also cuts down on greenhouse gasses from food transport and storage. Maintaining – or expanding – ornamental gardens is therapeutic but also can sustain pollinators and wildlife that are struggling to survive human-made hurdles.

Fire Improves Traditional Plants

Scholar Melinda Adams is reclaiming fire. “When you look at migration patterns of Indigenous peoples, we led with fire. It’s related to our subsistence diets, it’s what kept us healthy,” says Adams, a UC Davis scholar who identifies as Apache and researchs “Indigenous Epist(e)cologies,” or the merge of ecological knowledge with Afro-Black Indigenous epistemologies.

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