Design

10 Ways to Field a Flood in Marin City

by | Feb 9, 2021

Design idea

Ten future reconfigurations of a Marin City lagoon, park and highway site subject to flooding came from UC Berkeley students last fall. The students from Dr. Kristina Hill’s class shared their plans with the community and entered a national competition. “Marin City residents want access to nature for their kids, protection from flooding and safe travel in and out of their community. Communities like Marin City should get resilience investments first, because they’ve been underserved historically,” said Hill. “They have the worst current flooding in Marin, even without sea level rise.” The class is also coordinating with Kevin Conger at the landscape firm CMG, who worked with Hill to support East Oakland in the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, to help local residents develop a community-driven vision for the park and lagoon that considers comprehensive stormwater and tidal flood planning. 

Class Designs

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About The Author

Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

is KneeDeep’s managing editor. She is a Bay Area environmental writer and editor and co-author of a Natural History of San Francisco Bay (UC Press 2011). For the last decade, she’s been reporting on innovations in climate adaptation on the bayshore (Bay Nature). She is also an occasional essayist for the San Francisco Chronicle. In other lives, she has been a vintner, soccer mom, and waitress. She lives in San Francisco close to the Bay with her architect husband Paul Okamoto.